Latest News


Turtle
Turtle
Turtle

Responsible Reef Practices - Tip #4 12:52pm, Tue 05 Dec 2017

Cumberland Charter Yachts are dedicated to Eco-tourism, and have been a certified Eco-tourism operator since 2015, promoting sustainable travel that benefits local communities, culture and heritage to minimise impacts on the environment. We believe it is our responsibility to educate all our charter guests on environmental sustainability.

On your charter, you'll enjoy the many different activities and experiences the Great Barrier Reef and Whitsunday islands offer and it's important to enjoy them in a responsible and environmentally 'reef friendly' way. Cumberland Charter Yachts have written our own Responsible Reef Practice's guide with a copy provided on each charter yacht. Here we'll share with you the many ways that you can help us keep the Great Barrier Reef and Whitsundays pristine for years to come and enjoy your charter holiday in a sustainable way.

Read about Responsible Reef Practices Tip #1 - Anchoring and Mooring
Read about Responsible Reef Practices Tip #2 - Diving and Snorkelling
Read about Responsible Reef Practices Tip #3 - Waste (including sewage) and Litter

Around Turtles


The Great Barrier Reef gives visitors some special opportunities to closely observe the life cycle of one of nature's most ancient and fascinating creatures, the marine turtle.
The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park is a critical foraging and nesting area to six of the world's seven turtle species.
Globally, marine turtle numbers are rapidly declining which makes this Australian 'nursery' even more significant. It's vital that you be particularly careful when boating in areas known to have turtle populations or when you're watching turtle nesting.

Report entangled, stranded or dead turtle

In General


  • Never touch, grab or lean on turtles, hatchlings or eggs
  • Do not try to feed turtles
  • Do not light campfires on turtle nesting beaches

  • When viewing from boats


  • Be on the look out for surfacing turtles in areas such as shallow reef flats and seagrass beds.
        Travel slowly in these areas, with no wake
  • If a turtle is close to your vessel, engage neutral and allow the animal to move freely
  • Do not encircle or trap turtles with vessels. Allow an escape route
  • Do not drive your vessel over a turtle
  • Do not pursue turtles if they try to avoid the vessel or flee the area.
  • go back